Practice Present Perfect Tense | English Grammar Course #6 | CheckUp


Hi, everyone. I’m Esther. We’re now doing a checkup for the present perfect tense. We’re going to do a lot of practice questions, so let’s get started. For this checkup, we’ll take a look at the present perfect tense. Which describes an action that happened at an unknown or indefinite time in the past. Let’s look at the first sentence. ‘She _blank_ read that book.’ The subject in this sentence is ‘she’. For he/she/it, in this tense we say, ‘has’. ‘She has’. Now, take a look at the verb. It looks like ‘read’. But remember we need to use the past participle of the verb. So It’s actually ‘read’. ‘read’ and ‘read’ are spelled the same. ‘She has read that book.’ The second sentence says, ‘They _blank_ visit China.’ ‘visit’ is the verb that you want to use here. For ‘I’, ‘you’, ‘we’ and ‘they’, we use ‘have’. Not ‘has’. ‘They have’ Now, what’s the past participle of visit? The answer is ‘visited’. ‘They have visited China.’ Next, ‘We _blank_ see that concert.’ Again, for ‘I’, ‘you’, we’ and ‘they’
– we use ‘have’. ‘We have’.
Now, the past participle of ‘see’ is ‘seen’. ‘We have seen that concert.’ Now, let’s look for the mistake in the next sentence. ‘Rick have been to Cuba.’ Take a look at the subject, ‘Rick’. Rick is a ‘he’. So instead of ‘have’, we need to change
this to ‘has’. ‘Rick has been to Cuba.’ ‘Sally and I hasn’t finished work.’ The subject in this sentence is ‘Sally’
and ‘I’. The pronoun for that is ‘we’. ‘We hasn’t finished work.’ That still sounds weird, right? We have to change this to ‘have not’ or the contraction ‘haven’t’. And finally, ‘I did go to the doctor.’ Now this sentence makes sense, but it’s not
the present perfect tense. We have to change it. Remember, we use ‘have’ for the subject, ‘I’. But we’re not done. What is the past participle of ‘go’? It is ‘gone’. ‘I have gone to the doctor.’ Great job. Let’s move on to the next checkup. In this checkup, we’ll talk about the present
perfect tense and how it can be used to describe an action that started in the past and is still true today. The first sentence says, ‘I _blank_ known Carly since 1994.’ The subject is ‘I’. And we already have the past participle of
the verb, ‘know’. Which is ‘known’. What are we missing? The correct answer is ‘have’. For ‘I’, ‘you’, ‘we’ and ‘they’, we use ‘have’ after the subject. The next sentence says, ‘He has been here _blank_ 2 p.m.’ Now the first part is all there. ‘He has been’. However, remember that for the present perfect tense, we use ‘for’ or ‘since’ to talk about how long that action has been true. In this case, we use ‘since’. Because 2 p.m. is a specific period in time. Next it says, ‘She _blank_ liked Tom since June.’ The subject is ‘she’. And we have the past participle of the verb
‘like’, which is ‘liked’. What are we missing? Again, we need ‘have’ or ‘has’. Because the subject is ‘she’… Can you figure out which one you need? The correct answer is ‘has’. ‘She has liked Tom since June.’ Now, I want you to find a mistake in the next sentence. ‘I have worked here six months ago.’ Can you find a mistake here? ‘I have worked’ – that’s correct. However, in the present perfect tense, we don’t use ‘ago’. This is talking about more the past. We want to talk about ‘since’ or ‘for’ instead. Now ‘six months’ is not a specific time.
So we don’t use ‘since’. Instead, we talk about the duration.
So we need ‘for’. We’ll say, ‘I have worked here for six months.’ Let’s take a look at the next sentence. ‘Jen have a cold for two weeks.’ At first glance, this doesn’t seem that wrong. But remember, Jen is a ‘she’. So we need ‘has’. ‘Jen has’. But wait a minute, ‘Jen has have a cold’? That’s not right either. We need the past participle of ‘have’. What is the past participle? The correct answer is ‘had’. ‘Jen has had a cold for two weeks.’ And finally, ‘We haven’t went home since Friday.’ This one is a little tricky. The subject is ‘we’. ‘We have… have not’. That’s correct. The contraction is ‘haven’t’.
‘We haven’t’. Now the problem is, we have this verb ‘went’. That’s in the past simple tense. We need the past participle of ‘go’. The correct answer is ‘gone’. ‘We haven’t gone home since Friday.’ Good job, guys. Let’s move on to the next checkup. In this checkup, we’ll take a look at the present perfect tense. And how it is used to describe an action that finished recently. We’ll be focusing on the words, ‘just’, ‘already’ and ‘recently’ to show this. Let’s take a look at the first sentence. ‘She has just _blank_ that book.’ And we’re using the verb, ‘read’. Remember, we take the subject, ‘she’. And for ‘he’, ‘she’ and ‘it’, we say ‘has’. So that’s correct. Now we need the past participle of ‘read’. And that is ‘read’. ‘She has just read that book.’ You’ll notice I use the word, ‘just’ right before the past participle. Next it says, ‘They have already’ and the verb is ‘wake up’. If the subject is ‘he’, ‘she’, or ‘it’, we use ‘has’. But if the subject is ‘I’, ‘you’, ‘we’ or ‘they’, we use ‘have’. So that’s correct. ‘They have’. Also we have the word ‘already’ here
to show that it happened recently or that it finished recently. Now the verb is ‘wake up’. We need the past participle of ‘wake up’, and that is ‘woken up’. So the answer is, ‘They have already woken up.’ The next sentence says, ‘We have recently _blank_ work.’ And the verb is ‘finish’. ‘We have’, that’s correct. And we have the word ‘recently’ to show when
the action finished. And now we need to find the past participle
of the verb ‘finish’. The correct answer is. ‘We have recently finished, -ed, work.’ Now try to find the mistake in the next sentence. ‘Morty has eaten just.’ This sounds a little strange, right? That’s because ‘just’ needs to come before the verb. Therefore, the answer is ‘Morty has just eaten.’ The next sentence says, ‘Karen has recently be sick.’ Karen is a ‘she’. So ‘has’ is correct. And there we have ‘recently’. Now we need the past participle of the verb. ‘be’ is our verb and the past participle of ‘be’ is ‘been’. ‘Karen has recently been sick.’ And finally, ‘I have gone already to the
dentist.’ This is similar to another question we looked
at just before. ‘I have gone already to the dentist.’ The placement of ‘already’ is a little awkward. So we can say, ‘I have already gone.’ So we can put ‘already’ before the verb, ‘I have already gone to the dentist’ Or we can put this at the end, ‘I have gone to the dentist already.’ Both of those are correct. Now, good job. That is the end of the checkup. Let’s move on. Excellent job, everyone. You just learned about the present perfect tense. There was a lot to learn, but you did a wonderful job. Keep studying English. I know that It’s hard, but you will get better
with time, effort and practice. I’ll see you in the next video.

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